New recipes

Staying Strong During Lent

Staying Strong During Lent

Healthy meal options to keep you on track

Making sacrifices and giving up indulgences are a big part of Lent. Most commonly, people give up chocolate, desserts, candy, carbs, meat, or other guilty pleasures, and around this time, it starts to get rough. Seeing co-workers munch on candy bars or receive sunflowers made out of chocolate (OK, maybe that only happens in our office) makes sticking to the promise a little more tricky.

To help those of you still on the bandwagon continue to succeed for the latter half of Lent, we’ve put together a healthy and delicious menu to keep you on track.

Enjoy and please let us know how it’s going!

Cucumber and Dill Salad

A refreshing and light spring salad, this recipe is packed full of flavor and is low in calories and fat.

Miso-Glazed Broiled Salmon

Heart-healthy salmon is glazed with flavorful miso. Serve this recipe over steamed greens like bok choy.

Using a vegetable peeler to shave strips of raw asparagus gives way to a crunchy side dish that’s topped with a nutty, cheesy dressing.

Coconut Frozen Yogurt with Cinnamon

Made with Greek yogurt and flavored with Stevia and cinnamon, this is a healthier "dessert" that provides a sweet option without being considered a conventional dessert (think chocolate cake or pie).


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Recipe: Babbo Finzi’s ‘Pizzagaina’ (Pizza Rustica)

When I was a young boy we would drive down to Hoboken to visit my Uncle Sal and Aunt Antionette in their red brick row house. The part I loved best was their lower floor. I suppose you could call it a basement, but it was really like a finished apartment, even though there were large, silver-painted heating pipes running along the ceiling, with Nonna Finzi sitting quietly in the lower front parlor as the loud chaos of our Italian families cooked, played and teased one another. When it was warm out, the men would play and gamble and argue in the bocce court behind their vegetable garden.

Try our other favorite Easter recipes here:

An Easter Sunday feast will soon break the 40-day Lenten fast, and it starts with Pizza Gain (aka Pizza Rustica). Get…

Posted by Italian Sons and Daughters of America on Thursday, April 1, 2021

But most of all, I remember the kitchen down there…white subway tile running all the way up to meet the ceiling…and the big pots…and those great smells. It seems that just about every time I visited, there was a huge pot of Sunday Gravy on the stove top simmering and letting its rich smells escape through the place and into my nostrils. There seemed to be an endless supply of meatballs (polpette), sausages and braciole. Then at Easter time there was a real treat: Pizzagaina.

Like ISDA on Facebook, and get the latest Italian food, culture and entertainment news.

In our family, that’s what we called it. PizzaGAINA, pronounced PEETS-a-GAYN-a. But depending on what part of Italy your family comes from, and the dialect spoken, you might hear it called any of the following: Pizzachiena, Pizza Chena, or even Pizza Rustica. A rough translation in all cases is “full pie” with the latter being “rustic pie.” Pizza Cena would mean “dinner pie.” There is also another version called Pizza Ripiena that is thinner and more of a double stuffed crust pizza, and definitely not as thick as the Pizzagaina “full” pies. Never thought about it before, but maybe they are called “full” because that’s how they’ll make you feel.

It’s usually made before Easter on Good Friday and eaten on Easter Sunday as a celebratory meat pie to break the Lenten fast. After having given up all red meats during Lent, this dish is really going off the wagon because it contains lots of different meats and cheeses. An Easter feast might also have meat in other courses, too. You can imagine in times past how a spring lamb or pig were slaughtered or even a cinghiale (wild boar) was hunted and butchered in preparation for the Easter festa–a big deal after a lean winter and Lent.

Usually, an hour or two before they put out the pasta, sausages, brasciole and meatballs, my Aunt Anne would put out a tray of mixed antipasti along with the Pizzagaina for slicing. While I loved picking on a few olives, some chunks of provolone and salami, the real prize was getting a nice wedge of pizzagaina. Often it was still warm with its thick, eggy, meaty filling of salty ham, salami, chunks of hard boiled eggs and other things I couldn’t identify as a kid (more than likely mortadellaor capicola).

There are two ways to make this Easter pie–one using thin, layered slices of cold cut meats, with the other using diced pieces of meat and sausage. The base of the filling is made with egg and cheese, something similar to a French quiche (but to my taste, far less greasy). Pretty much every family will have it’s own version. My Dad would call this type of recipe baBUCcia (sp?), a Molfetese dialect word he used to mean “all mixed up together.” While the ingredients might be similar, everyone makes it differently, and the recipe might change from region to region, perhaps a frugal habit of using up what meats were left over by the time the long winter reached Easter. Some make it looking very much like a proper meat pie in a pie pan, while most use a high sided spring form pan. Still others might make a large one in a lasagna pan, with far too many eggs (in my opinion), and cutting squares to feed a large family gathering.


Watch the video: ΚΑΛΗ ΣΑΡΑΚΟΣΤΗ!!! (December 2021).